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Campaign Forgotten is a unique title in many ways. It features much more naval action than any other title, it has squad or company-based encounters, and has a number of scenarios featuring nothing more than ships versus shore batteries. It does include a number of "forgotten" campaigns such as the Red River Campaign, Price's 1864 Missouri Campaign, and the various battles in the Carolinas. But overall, it is a subpar title featuring only a few fun, or even competitive, scenarios. As a result, I recommend few of these scenarios and have rated none of them excellent.

CONTENT

9 Total Scenarios Recommended

NOTE: ALL NUMBERS HERE REFLECT THE ACTIVE STRENGTHS OF THE ARMIES. THESE NUMBERS DO NOT INCLUDE PERMANENTLY FIXED UNITS.

36 Turns

015-620221 - (H) Valverde.20

My Rating: Good

2,702

1,675

867

160

8

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

2,168

0

2,048

120

6


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  A Confederate brigade of 4,000 men under BG H H Sibley invades New Mexico to claim a vast territory reaching all the way to California.  Starting from El Paso, their first objective is Santa Fe.  Standing in their way, occupying Fort Craig, is a scratch force of US Regulars, volunteers and New Mexico militia u nder Col E R S Canby. After threatening Fort Craig, Sibley bypasses the formidable position and regains the road north of the Mesa DeLa Contedera, as Canby dispatches troops to hold the critical Rio Grande crossings. A meeting engagement quickly builds into an all out battle involving nearly equal numbers.  Reference: "Bloody Valverde" by John Taylor.

Analysis - This is a small scale back and forth battle between company sized units along the Rio Grande. Just a quick little skirmish for a good time. 

 

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21 Turns

051-640220 - (H) Olustee

My Rating: Good

5,665

4,745

600

320

16

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

6,257

4,602

1,335

320

16


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  Olustee--or Ocean Pond, Florida  Abraham Lincoln wanted to establish a Union presence in Florida to launch the state on the road to reunion, as was happening in Louisiana, Arkansas and other states, but it is sometimes dangerous for political motives to dictate military operations.  In one particular, Olustee was a lot like the big battle at Chickamauga, five months earlier.  The similarity is that in both instances, they were the only game in town. In September '63, Gettysburg had been fought, Vicksburg had been captured, and for different reasons the armies involved were inactive..  By February 64, the Battle of Chattanooga had been fought and won by the Union, and the armies were girding up for the spring of 1864. When Truman Seymour invaded Florida, there was not a lot of pressure elsewhere to prevent the Confederacy from strongly reinforcing Joe Finnegan's little army.  The result was two closely matched forces, with the rebels fighting on their home turf, just like Chickamauga.  The three forward objectives are situated on the terrain where the battle actually took place.  Reference:  Confederate Florida--the Road to Olustee" by William H Nulty.   

Analysis - This little scenario is a meeting engagement style battle with the two sides tangling over the main objective flags between them. The two sides are evenly matched in the thick woods and it will play out as a bloody head-on confrontation. 

 

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25 Turns

056-640408 - (H) Mansfield

My Rating: Good

11,610

6,679

4,211

720

36

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

10,805

6,502

3,903

400

20


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  The Battle of Mansfield was the pivotal encounter of the Red River Campaign.  Actually, Red River was not a "Forgotten Campaign."  Written about, studied by military professionals, on demand to be featured in a JTS product, the campaign had a profound affect on the war in the west.  It was a campaign of conquest and cotton.  While the Union fleet threaded its way up the Red River, Nathaniel Banks with an army of over 30,000 men paralleled the advance on land.  Maj Gen Richard Taylor led the woefully outnumbered Confederate force in Louisiana.  Until sufficient troops could be scraped together to resist Banks, all Taylor could do was retreat, almost all the way to Texas.  Finally, joined by troops rushed up from Texas, and a little army of Arkansas and Missouri troops sent to aid him from Arkansas, Taylor turned at bay in front of the town of Mansfield.  Union troops, approaching on a narrow sandy track through the pinewoods, came upon an opening in the trees with Confederate troops aligned in a classic L-shaped ambush.  The Scenario starts at 8 AM, as leading Union elements approach Sabine Crossroads.  Reference:  "One Damn Blunder From Beginning to End: The Red River Campaign of 1864" by Gary D Joiner.  

Analysis - Just a good medium-sized battle. The limited space to maneuver will funnel the action around the center of the map. 

 

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24 Turns

058-640409 - (H) Pleasant Hill

My Rating: Good

11,343

10,823

0

520

26

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

13,794

10,771

2,303

720

36


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  On April 8th, Richard Taylor's Confederate army stopped Banks' Red River column at the Battle of Mansfield, or Sabine Crossroads.  The Union forces were decisevely whipped and routed from the field.  As they retreated, however, they passed through fresh troops of the 16th and 19th Corps who took up a defensive position at Pleasant Hill.  Taylor's army, reinforced by a fresh contingent from Arkansas, meets Emory's Division of the 19th and A.J. Smith's hard-bitten veterans of the 16th Corps.  The forces are closely balanced.  Anything can happen.  Reference: "One Damn Blunder From Beginning to End: The Red River Campaign of 1864" by Gary D Joiner.  

Analysis - This will be a violent clash of arms around Pleasant Hill as the Confederates must attack frontally to achieve a victory here. Neither side has very good infantry so it will be a bitter struggle as each commander will have to work to keep his men under control and his line from crumbling. The Federals will have more guns and be on the defensive. 

 

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42 Turns

062-640430 - (H) Jenkins' Ferry

 My Rating: Good

9,155

6,063

2,572

520

26

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

10,350

8,424

1,686

240

12


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  As an arm of the Union forces involved in the Red River Campaign, troops from the Dept of Arkansas, under BG Fred Steele, had advanced toward  Shreveport, Louisiana, toward a planned junction with MG N P Banks' Dept of the Gulf.  Hearing of Banks' defeat near Mansfield La, and fearing he was the next target, Steele decided to retreat to Camden, Arkansas.  Probably in error, Confederate LtG Kirby Smith pulled most of his troops from in front of Banks and marched hard to overtake Steele.  He caught up with the Yankees at the Saline River and saw the opportunity to overwhelm them as they crossed the river.  The result was this savage little battle in the mud of the Saline River valley.  Due to the saturated ground, it was impossible for either side to dig trenches. Makeshift breastworks from fallen trees were all that could be accomplished.  Exiting wagons can get the Yankees lots of victory points, but they must first repair the bridge at Jenkins Ferry in order to retreat.  Recommended house rule:  Any Union troops and supplies remaining on the eastern side of the Saline River at the end of the scenario count as prisoners of the Rebels, and points should be subtracted from the Union total.  Reference: "The Battle of Jenkins Ferry" by Joe Walker

Analysis - This setup looks pretty odd at first but then you realize it isn't "that bad." It might even be "interesting." But very gimmicky. If you check out the scenario yourself, you will see what I am talking about. But it is a unique design, so why not give it a whirl?

 

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27 Turns

070-640610 - (H) Brice's Cross Roads

My Rating: Good

8,404

4,895

2,909

600

24

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

4,130

0

3,930

200

8


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  (R = Revised OOB, with unit ratings generally revised upward.)    In the summer of 1864, W.T. Sherman is leading a campaign to capture the City of Atlanta.  To supply the Union armies, Sherman must depend on a 500 mile long supply line, mostly railroads, that snake north all the way to the Ohio River.  He is confronted by the Army of Tennessee, under General Joe Johnston, but one of his greatest concerns is the vulnerability of his supply line, and the Confederates have just the man to exploit the vulnerability:  Maj Gen Nathan B. Forrest, AKA the "Wizard of the Saddle," but referred to by Sherman as "That Devil Forrest."  An expedition is outfitted in Memphis under Br Gen Samuel Sturgis, and sent into the hinterlands of Mississippi to kill or capture Forrest.  Sturgis has a division each of cavalry and infantry, substantially outnumbering Forrest, but Forrest does not hesitate.  He collects his scattered forces and plots a collision course to stop the Yankee invasion. It is June 10th, a dreadfully hot day in the piney woods of Mississippi.  Union cavalry presses on in search of an enemy who is only too glad to be found, leaving the infantry division to catch up.  Reference: "The Battle of Brice's Crossroads" by Stewart L. Bennett

Analysis - A tougher battle for the Rebels. Which is odd since the actual Battle of Brice's Cross Roads was a decisive Confederate victory. I have a hard time recommending this one for numerous historical reasons related to the fighting. But, it is still hard to resist this one.

 

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39 Turns

092-641023 - (H) Battle of Westport

My Rating: Good

16,290

200

15,290

800

40

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

10,387

75

9,992

320

16


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  Having penetrated the Union's defensive screen along the Big Blue River, Confederate forces pivoted to attack Westport from the south.

Analysis - This is a really complex battle all things considered. Both sides have some pretty poorly-rated men and have numerous creeks to contend with. The ensuing battle should be pretty intense but the scenario likely lasts for ten turns too long. Still, it is worth a look if you enjoy battles with some craziness to them. 

 

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101 Turns

108-650319 - (H) Bentonville

My Rating: Poor

56.306

50,186

4,400

1,720

86

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

21,221

14,102

6,159

960

48


Description - (Historical 30 minute turns)  This is the full three-day Battle of Bentonville.   It was almost distressing to deploy the serried ranks of the Confederate Army, especially the once proud and powerful Army of Tennessee.  Fifty men surviving of what was once a thousand man regiment could be counted as one of the stronger units on the field.  Compare them to the proud Union Army which had marched as a unit from Chattanooga, to Atlanta, Savannah, Columbia, and now face one more fight.  In less than two months the Yankees would have their parade in Washington DC, while the surrendered ex-rebels made their ways individually back to their homes, or what remained of them. Sherman does not want this fight.  Some will say, he pulled his punches on this one, not wanting to waste lives, especially those of his own soldiers, when the inevitable was clear for all to see.  For that reason, players should study the relative loss values of the two armies, and watch Geary's division sit in reserve for two days (unless attacked!). References:  "The Battle of Bentonville; Last Stand in the Carolines" by Mark Bradley  Map book by Mark A Moore

Analysis - If you are looking to play this then chances are you are just doing so for historical reasons. This lopsided battle is brutal for the Rebels. The only advantage the Confederates have is that the Federal casualty points cost 2x as much as the Confederate losses do. This means each Yankee casualty counts as 2 casualties in relation to points. While this does help it hardly helps enough. This battle is going to be a very, very, difficult one to win for the Confederates.

 

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24 Turns

110-650319 - Day 1 - Bentonville

 My Rating: Good

17,442

16,592

90

760

38

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

15,578

14,086

612

880

44


Description - (Historical 30 minute turns)  This is the first day of the Battle of Bentonville It was almost distressing to deploy the serried ranks of the Confederate Army, especially the once proud and powerful Army of Tennessee.  Fifty men surviving of what was once a thousand man regiment could be counted as one of the stronger units on the field.  Compare them to the proud Union Army which had marched as a unit from Chattanooga, to Atlanta, Savannah, Columbia, and now face one more fight.  In less than two months the Yankees would have their parade in Washington DC, while the surrendered ex-rebels made their ways individually back to their homes, or what remained of them. Sherman does not want this fight.  Some will say, he pulled his punches on this one, not wanting to waste lives, especially those of his own soldiers, when the inevitable was clear for all to see.  CS General Joe Johnston, however, was not as solicitous.  One strong punch would knock out Slocum's Army of Georgia, and then he could turn his attention to the Army of the Tennessee.  Could the gallant Confederate Army of Tennessee do it one more time? Reference: The Battle of Bentonville by Mark L Bradley

Analysis - This short battle can be a lot of fun. The Confederates have a far more realistic chance of winning this scenario than they do the full three-day Bentonville battle. Check this one out if you are looking to fight at Bentonville. 

 

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36 Turns

111-650319 - Day 1 - Bentonville

My Rating: Good

17,442

16,592

90

760

38

TOTAL

Infantrymen

Cavalrymen

Artillerymen

Cannons

15,578

14,086

612

880

44


Description - (Historical 20 minute turns)  This is the first day of the Battle of Bentonville It was almost distressing to deploy the serried ranks of the Confederate Army, especially the once proud and powerful Army of Tennessee.  Fifty men surviving of what was once a thousand man regiment could be counted as one of the stronger units on the field.  Compare them to the proud Union Army which had marched as a unit from Chattanooga, to Atlanta, Savannah, Columbia, and now face one more fight.  In less than two months the Yankees would have their parade in Washington DC, while the surrendered ex-rebels made their ways individually back to their homes, or what remained of them. Sherman does not want this fight.  Some will say, he pulled his punches on this one, not wanting to waste lives, especially those of his own soldiers, when the inevitable was clear for all to see.  CS General Joe Johnston, however, was not as solicitous.  One strong punch would knock out Slocum's Army of Georgia, and then he could turn his attention to the Army of the Tennessee.  Could the gallant Confederate Army of Tennessee do it one more time? Reference: The Battle of Bentonville by Mark L Bradley

Analysis - This 20-minute turn version of scenario 110 makes it a bit harder for the Rebs by allowing the Union more turns to damage their army and move forward more methodically. It's still a decent scenario though. 

 

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